Jutze live in Konstanz (Splitternacht)

Am letzten Donnerstag hatte ich das Vergnügen bei der Splitternacht im K9 in Konstanz ein paar 52-Sekunden-Lieder zu spielen. Außer mir traten unter anderem die lauffreudigen Motorsensen auf, deren Lied “Mein Projekt” mir besonders gut gefiel. Meine Setlist sah so aus:

  1. Die wichtigen Fragen
  2. Einkaufszettel
  3. 79 Jahre
  4. Tapirlied
  5. Konrad
  6. Fremde Leute
  7. Der Speckgürtel von Paderborn
  8. Reis

The Brandos live in Metzingen

It was my 20th Brandos concert, yet the first in almost ten years. The band was on a bit of a hiatus. Now they have a new album (“Los Brandos”) just in time for the tour and speaking of tour, the current line-up is 3/4 of the 1997 summer tour line-up. I approached the concert on 7th June with few expectations. The first positive surprise was the venue (“Hirsch”), a rock pub with more than decent food, a charming staff, and an attentive audience.

Just to see the band on stage again was refreshing, no, rejuvenating! Those melodies and lyrics all came back (well, they never really left) and I found myself smiling while grooving along. Naturally, we all have aged. This wasn’t the sweaty no-compromises act that made me a fan back in 1995. Surprisingly, the show was rather hard rocking with only a couple of acoustic ballads in between. Songs like “The Solution” and “The Keeper” showed the band’s melodic side. Most of the newer songs rocked more heavily. The lead vocals were spot on, the rhythm section more controlled than it used to be.

The old material drew a lot of applause. The songs off the new album were received well, but hardly anyone had heard them before. It didn’t help that half of them were in Spanish and lacked the distinctive choruses that dominated earlier Brandos albums. Also, the newer arrangements take more time to build. The drums usually set in slowly, the rhythm guitar often remains tame until the refrain. I’m afraid that the hook lines didn’t stuck with me the first time around, very unlike my first Brandos live experience during which I heard and simultaneously inhaled killer tracks like “The Siege”, “Hard Times, Come Again No More” and “Not a Trace”.

One of the highlights was the acoustic rendition of “Love of My Life”, which had the audience singing along all the way to the back. The following song, “What Kind of a World”, was probably the most convincing new track. Performed solo by Dave Kincaid, it sounded more like Phil Ochs than CCR. I guess no one would have minded if he had added a couple of old classics right there and then (“The Other Side” from “The Light of Day – the Single” comes to my mind, or basically any other melodic Brandos song).

Was there anything to complain? Well, not really. I enjoyed the concert and I was (and am) happy to see the band back in the limelight. This being said, I could have done without the (in my ears) boring “Let It Go”. Finally, the live energy, the harmony vocals, and (yes, I’m nitpicking here) the fingered bass playing by Ernie Mendillo was missing. Frank Giordano did a fabulous job on backing vocals, make no mistake here. It’s just, well, after eleven shows I’ve seen with Dave, Frank AND Ernie on vocal duty, I’m probably spoiled. Speaking of Frank: In my opinion, he would have deserved lead vocals on a song – be it with “Jailer, Bring Me Water” or his great version of “I Got It” (or “Glory of Love” off his solo record?).

All in all, I’m happy that the Brandos are back and that I’ll be seeing them again this Saturday in Bad Rappenau!

The Brandos live in Metzingen-Glems

  1. Fight for Love
  2. The Only Love I Can Get
  3. Let It Go
  4. Anna Lee
  5. Señor Coyote
  6. The Solution
  7. The Keeper
  8. Suffer in Silence
  9. Querer a los Niños
  10. Love of My Life
  11. What Kind of a World
  12. She’s the One
  13. Woodstock Guitar
  14. Bella Encantadora
  15. Over the Border
  16. Pass the Hat
  17. Gettysburg
  18. Can’t Go Home
  19. Maligna Presencia
  20. These Troubled Times
  21. Nothing to Fear
  22. The Light of Day
  23. Gunfire at Midnight

Lektüre 2016

A list of books I finished reading in the last 12 months:

  • Poul Anderson: Rebellenwelt
  • Peter Ames Carlin: Bruce
  • Bronnie Ware: 5 Dinge, die Sterbende am meisten bereuen
  • Poul Anderson: Ehrenwerte Feinde
  • Frank Böttcher & Sven Plöger: Klimafakten
  • Michael Schumacher: Tankard – Life in Beermuda
  • Ashlee Vance: Elon Musk – How the Billionaire CEO of SpaceX and Tesla Is Shaping Our Future
  • Max Frisch: Homo Faber
  • Jojo Moyes: Me Before You
  • Götz Aly: Unser Kampf 1968
  • Javier Marías: Die sterblich Verliebten
  • Grady Hendrix: Horrorstör
  • Joël Dicker: The Truth About the Harry Quebert Affair
  • Max Frisch: Stiller
  • Meghann Foye: Lügen haben runde Bäuche
  • Elizabeth McKenzie: The Portable Veblen
  • Frank Portman: King Dork
  • David Safier: Mieses Karma
  • Julia Neumann: Odins Auge
  • Bernd Groot-Wilken, Kevin Isaac & Jörg-Peter Schräpler (Hrsg.): Sozialindices für Schulen
  • Andy Weir: The Martian
  • Roger Willemsen: Das Hohe Haus
  • Marie Fredriksson & Helena von Zweigbergk: Listen to My Heart – Meine Liebe zum Leben

Accuracy, Readability, and Mplus

The idea to create an algorithm that automatically scans scientific articles for the results of common statistical tests and evaluates the accuracy of these results seems straight-forward. Statcheck performs this, well, stat check. Now a lot of available papers have been automatically evaluated and the outcomes were posted on PubPeer.

So far, none of the (two) papers on pubpeer I co-authored raised an error flag. That’s reassuring. I went and (stat)checked my other publications, and behold: There was indeed an inconsistency in one of them. In Schult et al. (2016) I reported “chi-square(33) = 59.11, p = .004″. Statcheck expected p = .003. The cause of this discrepancy is the rounding of rounded results. The Mplus output showed a chi-square value of 59.109 and a p value of 0.0035. I rounded both values to make the results more readable, accepting that, for example, a value such as 0.00347something would be mistakenly rounded to 0.004 instead of 0.003. For the record: Whenever a test statistic’s p value is close to the chosen alpha level, I do use all available decimal places to evaluate the decision of statistical significance. Of course, I could just report all available digits all the time. Still, that smells of pseudo-accuracy, plus I like to think that I write for human readers, not for computer algorithms.

What’s the take home message here? I won’t be surprised when this error/discrepancy/inconsistency (what’s in a name?) is discovered and posted by the big machine. I will keep writing my papers with care, double-checking the results etc. (something my senior authors always condoned and enforced). And did I mention that I put replication materials online (unless privacy/copyright laws or, sadly, busyness prevent me from doing so)?

Jutze live in Waiblingen

Ich spielte am 18. Oktober in Waiblingen im Kulturhaus Schwanen bei der dortigen Open Stage einige 52-Sekunden-Lieder. Den gesamten Auftritt gibt es nun zum Runterladen und Nachhören. Falls das wen interessiert. Neun Minuten Kurzeweile mit einer Ansage und den folgenden Liedern:

  1. Einkaufszettel
  2. Konrad
  3. Fremde Leute
  4. Tapirlied
  5. 79 Jahre
  6. Reis

Jutze spielt am Dienstag in Waiblingen

Am kommenden Dienstag (18. Oktober) spiele ich im Schwanen in Waiblingen ein paar 52-Sekunden-Lieder. Kommt! Weitere Infos sind hier.

Richard Shindell live in Oldenburg

Shindell in Germany – it felt like my patriotic duty to attend the show in Oldenburg last Sunday. The Wilhelm 13 is a sweet, cozy venue. A steady stream of people arrived, every other wondering aloud that they had expected to be the only ones in the audience (partly due to the soccer match Germany vs. Norway, which took place that night.) In the end, the promoters had sold all tickets, making the event not just a musical success.

The show began shortly after 8 pm with “All Wide Open”, preceded by a quick “Guten Abend – that’s all I got”. The first set featured lots of new(ish) songs. “Transit” was more enigmatic than ever. It helped that the sound was very good, particularly the vocals. “Careless” was another early highlight. During “Parasol Ants”, Richard kept glancing at his lyrics book. With “Ascent” he warned the audience there would be mistakes because he hadn’t practiced the song and didn’t have the lyrics at hand. The rendition was spotless, though. This resulted in the situation of all available copies of “Blue Divide” being sold during the break. “Satellites” on the electric guitar had a nice drive. “Atlas Choking” has to be one of my favorite Shindell songs, and that night’s version was awesome.

The second set contained old and new, originals and covers side by side. “We Learned the Sea”, a Dar Williams cover, sounded particularly haunting. The venue wasn’t as hot as the UK pubs, and Richard seemed to appreciate the lack of sweat running down the guitar body. Anyway, “Are You Happy Now?” got some additional “Are You Happy Now?”s at the end and I think Clara lost some line during the last chorus. After announcing “The Next Best Western” and tuning the electric guitar for several minutes, the Western was ditched in favor of “There Goes Mavis” on the acoustic guitar.

“Any requests?”, Richard asked when he was called back for an encore. Silence. Then someone said: “Courier“. Good choice if you ask me. Great song, happy Johannes!

The second encore was a classic. I was just a bit confused by hearing the Joan Baez story while Richard seemed to play the intro to “The Ballad of Mary Magdalen” on the bouzouki. Naturally, “Reunion Hill” was played, eventually.

“Any more requests?”, was the question before the third encore. Silence. Then someone said: “Che Guevera T-Shirt”. “That’s a long and complicated song”, said Richard, considered it briefly, but then opted for “Stray Cow Blues”.

The Stage

  1. All Wide Open
  2. The Deer on the Parkway
  3. Transit
  4. Careless
  5. Parasol Ants
  6. Ascent
  7. Satellites
  8. Atlas Choking
  9. We Learned the Sea
  10. A Summer Wind, a Cotton Dress
  11. Midnight Bridge
  12. I Know You Rider
  13. Are You Happy Now?
  14. Get Up Clara
  15. There Goes Mavis
  16. The Courier
  17. Reunion Hill
  18. Stray Cow Blues

Bad Religion live in Stuttgart

Seit ich als Teenager anfing, mich für Musik zu begeistern, fürchtete ich Aussagen von Bands im Sinne von “auf dem neuen Album klingen wir erwachsener”. Denn das war stets das Signal für einen (teilweise starken) Qualitätsabfall. Mehr noch, ich wollte (und konnte) mir gar nicht richtig vorstellen, dass die ganzen guten Bands, die es gab, mal erwachsen bzw. einfach alt werden würden.

Obgleich der Punk tot war, reiften Bad Religion im Laufe der Zeit, mal besser, mal schlechter. Insgesamt schaffte es die Band jedenfalls von der 80er-Kult-Combo zu 90er-Stars zu werden und danach – trotz einiger schwächerer Alben – authentisch zu bleiben. Den Vorwurf, immer wieder das gleiche Lied zu schreiben, bekam die Gruppe schon früh in ihrer Karriere zu hören. Das war ihr freilich egal.

Der Reife-, sprich Alterungsprozess war am Montag Abend auch im Publikum zu sehen. Im ausverkauften Longhorn tummelten sich eher ältere Semester und nur ganz vereinzelt gefärbte Haare und Irokesenschnitte. Bestand etwa die Gefahr der Altersmilde? Das unangekündigte, eher unharmonische Vorprogramm (The Rattlesnakes) verzögerte den Auftritt der Hauptband, doch als es kurz nach 21 Uhr schließlich mit “Crisis Time” losging, sprang die Stimmung ruckartig von abwartend relaxed auf begeistert tobend um. Und damit nicht genug. Bei “Stranger Than Fiction” zeigte sich, dass die Alben aus den 90er-Jahren offenbar zu den beliebtesten gehörten. Neben erwartbaren Klassikern wurden immer wieder großartiger Überraschungen eingestreut, meine persönlichen Highlights waren dabei “Skyscraper” (!), “Dearly Beloved” und “Against the Grain”. Gut, letzteres war vielleicht auch deshalb herausragend, weil es eine klitzekleine Verschnaufpause bot. Denn Sauerstoff war schon bald Mangelware in der Halle. Wie sollte es auch anders sein, wenn die komplette Menge von der Bühne bis zum Mischpult bei “21st Century (Digital Boy)” in Bewegung war? Die während des Auftritts konsumierten Getränke wurden umgehend in Schweiß verwandelt. Nicht hygienisch, aber großartig!

Greg Graffin verstand es, die insgesamt eher knappen Ansagen herrlich lakonisch rüberzubringen. Beispielsweise hätte die Band schon immer über soziale Ungleichheiten gesungen, wobei sie am Anfang in den untersten 10 Prozent gewesen seien und nun eben – Augenzwinkern – in den obersten. “Sinister Rouge” war toll, “Generator” sowieso. “Punk Rock Song” läutete den Zugabenblock ein, der mit “American Jesus” (“see him on the Autobahn”) bestens beschlossen wurde. Ziemlich genau 90 Minuten lang dauerte das Dauerfeuer aus flotten Punksongs – und für arg viel mehr hätte die Kondition (oder zumindest der Sauerstoff) vermutlich auch kaum gereicht. Fest stand auf alle Fälle, dass Bad Religion auch anno 2016 frei von Ermüdungserscheinungen das machen, was sie am besten können: drei Akkorde in musikalische Begeisterung und akustische Energie verwandeln.

Bad Religion live in Stuttgart - pic by Jutze

  1. Crisis Time
  2. Supersonic
  3. Prove It
  4. Can’t Stop It
  5. Stranger Than Fiction
  6. I Want to Conquer the World
  7. Only Rain
  8. New America
  9. Skyscraper
  10. Modern Man
  11. Turn on the Light
  12. Anesthesia
  13. Flat Earth Society
  14. Against the Grain
  15. God Song
  16. 21st Century (Digital Boy)
  17. Fuck You
  18. Dearly Beloved
  19. Suffer
  20. Recipe for Hate
  21. Come Join Us
  22. Fuck Armageddon… This Is Hell
  23. Los Angeles Is Burning
  24. Do What You Want
  25. Overture
  26. Sinister Rouge
  27. Generator
  28. You
  29. Sorrow
  30. Punk Rock Song
  31. Infected
  32. American Jesus

Dar Williams live in Krefeld 2016

Nach dem schönen Konzert am selben Ort im vergangenen Jahr kehrte Dar Williams am 25. Mai in die Kulturfabrik zurück. Im Vorprogramm bot diesmal Vanessa van de Forst recht gewöhnlichen Country-Pop mit einer facettenreichen Stimme. Neben Mainstream-lastigen Stücken wie “Middle of Nowhere”, “Ponchartrain”, “Twenty One” und “Lucky” gab es mit “Jolene” (Dolly Parton) und “Free Fallin'” (Tom Petty) zwei nette Coverversionen.

Ganz anders dann Dar Williams mit ihrem eigenwilligen Folk. Zu nahezu jedem Lied streute sie eine umfangreiche Erläuterung ein und vertonte Themen wie moralische Kompasse, Babysitter, griechische Göttinnen, Psychotherapie, Gender und (natürlich?) Hippies kongenial. Das mit lieblichster Stimme gesungene “Family” war für mich einer der Höhepunkte des Abends. Dar ging auch auf zahlreiche Publikumswünsche ein und wurde gleich zweimal für eine Zugabe auf die Bühne zurückgerufen.

Dar Williams

  1. Emerald
  2. The Light and the Sea
  3. The Babysitter’s Here
  4. I Am the One Who Will Remember Everything
  5. Family
  6. I Had No Right
  7. After All
  8. Slippery Slope
  9. Mercy of the Fallen
  10. You’re Aging Well
  11. Iowa (Traveling III)
  12. Storm King
  13. When I Was a Boy
  14. February
  15. The Ocean

Manticess Videos

We made a couple of videos to go along with our new album. Check out “Johnny’s Guitar“, “Relentlessly” and “Lost in Broken Memories“!